Becoming More Sustainable

One of my goals for 2017 is to find more sustainable alternatives to the least sustainable things that I use on a regular basis. This generally means things that create waste where it could be avoided. I already buy most of my fruit and vegetables from the market, avoiding plastic there. In the absence of a place where I can bulk buy dried foods in Cambridge (most of what goes in our landfill bin is plastic wrap), I started to think about other ways to reduce waste around our house, and when I’m out and about.

Over the last 6 months or so, I have made four notable purchases which I feel have not only lessened my impact on the earth, but are either more cost-effective or practical (or both) than the previous alternatives.

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  1. KeepCup
    KeepCups, or reusable coffee cups are becoming much more common – most coffee chains offer reusable cups, and some give discounted prices for using a reusable one instead of a paper cup. For the longest time I didn’t realise that paper coffee cups weren’t recyclable, and I would always throw them in the recycling bin. After watching Hugh’s War on Waste and being told that in fact they weren’t recyclable, I decided to get a KeepCup to avoid creating unnecessary waste. I don’t buy coffee to take away that frequently, but my colleagues regularly buy coffee from the shop next to our office and when I got one it seemed ridiculous to be getting coffee in a paper cup when the shop was about 15ft from our office.

    KeepCups start from about £7.00 (the regular size starts from £10.00), and you can design your own, allowing you to choose from a wide range of colours to mix and match the different elements of your cup. They’re also currently doing a Star Wars series of themed cups, y’know, if you’re into that.

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  2. Chillys Bottle
    This has been my favourite and most useful purchase by far. I take it with me everywhere. It keeps cold water cold for 24 hours, and hot liquid warm for 12 hours. Great on a hot day when you want some cold water, or keeping your coffee hot for later. They’re not cheap, but the amount I’ve used it over the last few months, it’s definitely paid for itself. Mine cost £30 – I would guess the average person would manage to buy 30+ bottles of water in a year, so it is saving me money. I bought one for my boyfriend as well with his initials on it (because, custom).

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On Trying, part II

For the last few years I have made January a full-vegetarian month. This year is no different, and it’s usually about this time that I write something about it. Last year I wrote about how much I hate labelling myself as something based on the food that I choose to eat. And now I feel that enough time has been dedicated to wondering if I’m making good food choices (although, realistically, I will continue to think about it frequently) – I’m going to widen my view a little.

Not eating meat is one of the most straightforward ways of cutting your carbon footprint. But what about the other stuff? Waste is a huge problem, but much more challenging to tackle because it’s pervasive – most things are packaged in non-recyclable plastic, things are single-use, disposable, made for ultimate convenience. Whilst I think we’re pretty good at recycling and reducing waste in our house, I know there are ways we can do better. So this is what I’m going to be looking at this year. By no means am I going to end up with a ‘zero waste’ lifestyle – I know others advocate this, but for me, in the same way that I don’t think I’m capable of being vegan, I don’t think I’m capable of living zero waste. So instead, I am going to start where I am and look for the changes that can be made. Finding sustainable alternatives to the least sustainable products that I use, finding better companies to purchase from who align more happily with my values. I’m hoping that small steps like this will make for more lasting change. I’ll still be writing about baking, but I’ll be writing about this too.